PublicSquare Seminars

Douglas Massey – October 2018 America's Immigration Policy in Crisis

Douglas Massey – October 2018 America's Immigration Policy in Crisis

The seminar outlines the dysfunctional policy decisions that gave rise to an undocumented population that peaked at 12 million persons in 2008. It reviews what has happened to that population in subsequent years, focusing on the changing circumstances in Mexico and Central America and policy decisions taken during the Obama Administration. It concludes with a look at the policies unleashed by the Trump administration and their mismatch with the realities of traffic on the Mexico-U.S. border and the actual security needs of the United States.

Douglas S. Massey is the Henry G. Bryant Professor of Sociology and Public Affairs at Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. His award-winning publications include Climbing Mount Laurel: The Struggle for Affordable Housing and Social Mobility in an American Suburb, Brokered Boundaries: Creating Immigrant Identity in Anti-Immigrant Times, and Beyond Smoke and Mirrors: Mexican Immigration in an Age of Economic Integration. Since 1982 he has also co-directed (with Jorge Durand, University of Guadalajara), the Mexican Migration Project that was created to further our understanding of the complex process of Mexican migration to the United States. The recipient of many research grants and awards, including a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship, Massey has also served on the faculties of the University of Chicago and the University of Pennsylvania.

This event has been made possible through the generosity of Montecito Bank & Trust, Mitchell Kauffman and Joanne Moran.

Listen Now

Seminar Readings

Douglas S. Massey, “Today’s U.S.-Mexico ‘Border Crisis’ in 6 charts,” The Conversation, June 27, 2018
Douglas S. Massey, “America’s Immigration Policy Fiasco: Learning from Past Mistakes,” Daedalus, vol. 142, no. 3, 2013, pp. 5-15

Event Gallery

Becoming a Global Citizen – Sept 2018

Becoming a Global Citizen – Sept 2018

Preview screening of A Towering Task: A Peace Corps Documentary followed by a conversation and reception with its producer and director, Alana DeJoseph, who previously served as associate producer of the award-winning PBS documentaries The Greatest Good (about the U.S. Forest Service) and Green Fire (about conservationist Aldo Leopold). Founded during the Cold War, the Peace Corps stands as an icon of American idealism. From the beginning its mission of world peace and friendship proved to be a towering task. Imbued with the unbounded energy and vision of its charismatic leader, Sargent Shriver, and thousands of vigorous volunteers, the story of the Peace Corps is a uniquely American tale. From the political machinations to establish not just a brand new government agency, but a new concept in international relations, from the growing pains of an agency straining to define its mission, A Towering Task takes viewers on a journey of what it means to be a global citizen.

This event made possible through the generosity of the Juliane Heyman, Dan Meisel and Amy Wendel, and Union Bank.

Event Gallery

Nathaniel Persily – April 2018 Can Democracy Survive The Internet?

Nathaniel Persily – April 2018 Can Democracy Survive The Internet?

The Internet was once seen as a democratizing force, but today social media platforms have become exploitable intermediaries of political discourse. The velocity of online information and viral communication can easily create dysfunction in campaigns and within democracy. And for a relatively small investment in resources, a country’s media can be infiltrated by bots, trolls, hackers and leakers, without leaving much evidence of who sponsored the attack. In addition, through the use of algorithms that create “filter bubbles” and echo chambers, the Internet is further polarizing public opinion. How should governments, institutions, tech companies, communities, and individuals respond? How do we repair polarization created by the Internet?

Nathaniel Persily is the James B. McClatchy Professor of Law at Stanford Law School and co-director of the Stanford Project on Democracy and the Internet. A nationally recognized constitutional law expert, frequent media commentator, as well as award-winning educator, he is the editor of Solutions to Political Polarization in America, a contributor to The Washington Post and The New York Times, and the author of a work-in-progress that explores the Internet’s impact on U.S. democracy. A sought-after nonpartisan voice on voting rights, Persily has served as a special master or court-appointed expert to craft congressional or legislative districting plans for Georgia, Maryland, Connecticut, New York, North Carolina, and Pennsylvania. He received a B.A. and M.A. in political science from Yale; a J.D. from Stanford where he was President of the Stanford Law Review, and a Ph.D. in political science from UC Berkeley.

This event made possible through the generosity of George Gelles and Christine Garvey.

Listen Now

Seminar Readings

Nathaniel Persily, “The Campaign Revolution Will Not Be Televised,” The American Interest, vol. 11, no. 2, Oct. 10, 2015
Nathaniel Persily, “Can Democracy Survive the Internet?” Journal of Democracy vol. 28, April 2017

Event Gallery