PublicSquare Seminars

César Cuauhtémoc García Hernández – February 2021 Immigration Possibilities and Challenges

César Cuauhtémoc García Hernández – February 2021 Immigration Possibilities and Challenges

On the campaign trail, Democrats promised to break from the Trump administration’s immigration policies. Already, the Biden-Harris administration has taken several steps in that direction, but the path ahead is filled with political obstacles and legal challenges. César Cuauhtémoc García Hernández will discuss options available to the new administration and challenges it is likely to face—from activists on the left and Republicans on the right.

César Cuauhtémoc García Hernández is a professor of law at the University of Denver and a practicing immigration lawyer. He is a pioneering scholar in the new field of “crimmigration,” which focuses on the intersection of criminal law and the immigration system. His recent book, Migrating to Prison: America’s Obsession with Locking Up Immigrants, is “a ‘must-read’ for any American interested in the tragic humanitarian impacts of the mass detention of immigrants.” He is also the author of Crimmigration Law and the publisher, since 2009, of crimmigration.com. His op-eds have appeared in The New York Times, Los Angeles Times, The Guardian, Newsweek, Salon, and La Opinión. He regularly appears in news stories about immigration matters, including on MSNBC, NPR, and Univision. García Hernández is a graduate of Brown University and Boston College Law School.

Seminar Readings

César Cuauhtémoc García Hernández, “Biden’s Migration Policy Options,” Oxford Faculty of Law Border Criminologies (January 11, 2021)
Maria Sacchetti, “Biden Sees Obama’s Mass Deportations as a ‘Big Mistake,’” The Washington Post (December 2, 2020)
Noah Lanard, “Biden Pledged to Close For-Profit ICE Detention Centers. Will He Follow Through?” Mother Jones (January 27, 2021)

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Recorded on February 24, 2021

Alex Keyssar – November 2020 Reforming the Electoral Process:  What Is To Be Done?

Alex Keyssar – November 2020 Reforming the Electoral Process: What Is To Be Done?

This webinar focuses on what we have learned about electoral processes from November’s historic presidential election – and what we might want to think about changing. Among the topics engaged are: the possibility of Electoral College reform; the need for a constitutional amendment guaranteeing the right to vote; the need for more nationally uniform procedures across the states; better funded election administration; and stronger safeguards against the many different varieties of voter suppression.

Alexander Keyssar is Matthew W. Stirling Jr. Stirling Professor of History and Social Policy at Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government. Widely regarded as “America’s greatest historian of democracy,” he is the author of numerous books, including Why Do We Still Have the Electoral College? (released July 2020) and The Right to Vote: The Contested History of Democracy in the United States, a 2001 Pulitzer Prize finalist and winner of the Beveridge Award from the American Historical Association for the best book in U.S. history. Keyssar has also taught at Duke University, MIT, and Brandeis University. He graduated from Harvard University with a PhD in the History of American Civilization.

Seminar Readings

Alexander Keyssar, “The Real Grand Bargain, Coming Undone,” The Washington Post (August 19, 2011)
Alexander Keyssar, “Voter Suppression Returns: Voting Rights and Partisan Practices,” Harvard Magazine (July-August 2012)
Alexander Keyssar, “The Strange Career of Voter Suppression,” The New York Times (February 12, 2012)
Alexander Keyssar, “How Has the Electoral College Survived for This Long?” The New York Times (August 3, 2020)
Alexander Keyssar, “The Stubborn Survival of the Electoral College,” The Wall Street Journal (August 13, 2020)

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Recorded on November 22, 2020

Jeffrey Rosen – October 2020 The Future of the Supreme Court

Jeffrey Rosen – October 2020 The Future of the Supreme Court

Jeffrey Rosen discusses the future of the Supreme Court and the key constitutional issues it will face, such as free speech, religious liberty, and civil rights. At a time of deep partisan polarization, he talks about how the Supreme Court can maintain its bipartisan legitimacy and independence. Finally, Rosen explores the arguments for and against calls for structural reform of the judiciary, including court packing and term limits.

Jeffrey Rosen serves as President & CEO of the National Constitution Center, Professor at The George Washington University Law School, and Contributing Editor of The Atlantic. He is the author of six books including, most recently, Conversations with RBG: Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Life, Love, Liberty, and Law. He has also written William Howard Taft: The American Presidents Series; Louis D. Brandeis: American Prophet; The Supreme Court: The Personalities and Rivalries that Defined America; The Most Democratic Branch: How the Courts Serve America; The Naked Crowd: Reclaiming Security and Freedom in an Anxious Age; and The Unwanted Gaze: The Destruction of Privacy in America. He is co-editor of Constitution 3.0: Freedom and Technological Change. Rosen is a graduate of Harvard College; Oxford University, where he was a Marshall Scholar; and Yale Law School.

Seminar Readings

Jess Bravin, Brent Kendall, and Jacob Gershman, “What Trump Pick Amy Coney Barrett Could Mean for Future of the Supreme Court,” Wall Street Journal, (September 26, 2020)
Jeffrey Rosen, “John Roberts Is Just Who the Supreme Court Needed,” The Atlantic, (July 13, 2020)
Ryan D. Doerfler and Samuel Moyn, “Reform the Court, but Don’t Pack It,” The Atlantic, (August 8, 2020)

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Recorded on October 25, 2020

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